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Clive McGoun

Holding space - the practical power of empathy

1 min read

From Heather Plett talking about how a palliative care nurse 'held space' for her and her family during the death of her mother. From the experience she abstracts the following principles:

  1. Give people permission to trust their own intuition and wisdom. 
  2. Give people only as much information as they can handle. 
  3. Don’t take their power away. 
  4. Keep your own ego out of it. 
  5. Make them feel safe enough to fail. 
  6. Give guidance and help with humility and thoughtfulness. 
  7. Create a container for complex emotions, fear, trauma, etc. 
  8. Allow them to make different decisions and to have different experiences than you would. 

 

http://heatherplett.com/2015/03/hold-space/

Clive McGoun

Clive McGoun

davidselvaruiz | Web personal de David Selva

Lecturer in comm university of cadz

Clive McGoun

The most popular Lifesaving Poems | Anthony Wilson

Anthony Wilson started writing down his favourite poems (one per poet) in a notebook. He then moved to keeping this blog. Now the blog has itself been published in paper form.

Clive McGoun

Clive McGoun

Digital Humanities projects

Lacuna stories looks like a great tool.

Clive McGoun

Readlists

Beginnings of a readlist for communication and care. To be continued ...

Clive McGoun

Turn Your iOS Device Into an Extra Monitor With Duet

This costs £11.99 but might actually be worth it in making writing longer documents that much easier.

Clive McGoun

What was Occupy all about?

1 min read

From the beginning there were two main parts to Occupy. There was the cause of economic justice — the idea that resources shouldn’t be distributed so unevenly. This idea, in its myriad forms, drove marches and injected the rhetoric of the “99 percent” into the political dialogue. This was what the press often thought Occupy was all about.

Less understood was the other part of Occupy — the part that was about the need for community. Occupiers came to the camps to care for others as much as they came to be cared for. People had to find a way to matter to each other in ways that weren’t mediated by the social services, the justice system, the institutions we stick each other into.

It was this need to serve each other, not any political message, that stocked the kitchens and filled the comfort barrels. It was that which kept volunteers up for days, taking care of drug addicts and neurotic students and old men with failing bodies.

 

Quinn Norton

http://www.wired.com/2012/12/a-eulogy-for-occupy/

Clive McGoun